Skip to main content

Information Literacy: Home

Connelly Library

Our Teaching Mission

To facilitate activities in the teaching and understanding of Information Literacy (IL) competencies in order to support and enhance the  La Salle University curriculum and encourage the development of lifelong learning skills. 

Information Literacy implies a general understanding of and competence in three integrally related areas:

  • Knowing how information is formally and informally produced, organized and disseminated;
  • Knowing how knowledge is communicated and;
  • Knowing how to evaluate, synthesize and incorporate information into written, oral and media presentations                                                  

Scheduling Library Instruction

The Connelly Library provides a variety of instructional services to La Salle University undergraduate and graduate students. Instruction may include any of the following:

  • Formal Classroom Instruction (face-to-face in the library or your classroom)
  • Online Library Instruction (hosted by Zoom)
  • Scheduled appointments with a teaching librarian
  • Course related/assignment specific instruction
  • 1-on-1 at the Public Service Desk 
  • Hands-On Exercises

All formal instruction (F2F or online) should be scheduled at least two weeks in advance to ensure the use of the Library classroom and allow time for preparation and dialogue between faculty and the teaching librarian.

To find out more or to schedule a session, please contact Bernetta Doane at 215.951.1287 or doane@lasalle.edu

 

 

What is It? and Why is it Important?

What is Information Literacy?

Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning. (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2015)

Why it is Important?

A 2017 survey* of 42,000 students in more than 1,700 courses at 12 major research universities showed that:

•Retention rates were higher for students whose courses included IL instruction.
•Students whose courses included IL instruction reported higher average first-year GPAs than those whose courses did not.
•Students who took IL instruction successfully completed 1.8 more credit hours per year than students who did not.
 

Information Literacy