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Creating a Bibliography: Activity

Annotated Bibliography activity

Locate this article:

 

Keane, Helen, Megan Weier, Doug Fraser, and Coral Gartner. “‘Anytime, Anywhere’: Vaping as Social Practice.” Critical Public Health 27, no. 4 (September 2017): 465–76. doi:10.1080/09581596.2016.1250867

OR

Van Doren, B. M., & Horton, K. G. (2018). A continental system for forecasting bird migration. Science (New York, N.Y.), 361(6407), 1115-1118. doi:10.1126/science.aat7526

 

Export it into RefWorks and format it in MLA 8th (DOI) style

Create an annotation for this article.  See the box below for elements to include.  Always check the guidelines from your professor before creating an annotated bibliography.

Some elements of an Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography

What is the Source? (this is the citation which you can get from REFWORKS)

 

What was the research?

 

What were the findings?

 

What is the relevancy?

OR as the Purdue OWL suggests:

 

  • Summarize: Some annotations merely summarize the source. What are the main arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your annotations will determine how detailed your summary is.

     

  • Assess: After summarizing a source, it may be helpful to evaluate it. Is it a useful source? How does it compare with other sources in your bibliography? Is the information reliable? Is this source biased or objective? What is the goal of this source?

     

  • Reflect: Once you've summarized and assessed a source, you need to ask how it fits into your research. Was this source helpful to you? How does it help you shape your argument? How can you use this source in your research project? Has it changed how you think about your topic?